Favourite Things: Ulvi Kasimov, .Art

SLIDESHOW: Ulvi Kasimov is one of Russia’s most prolific venture capitalists and a passionate art collector.

A collection of his favourite artworks.

Ulvi Kasimov is one of Russia’s most prolific venture capitalists and a passionate art collector. Two years ago he founded .Art, a new domain name for creatives that he calls “the digital dress code for the art world”. Since its launch, over 11,000 names have been registered on .Art: ranging from street artist Banksy, singer Beyoncé, and art institutions such as the Centre Pompidou and the Guggenheim Museum.

Here he tells Billionaire about his favourite artworks.

Tales of Don Juan of Persia by Uruch Beg
This is a diary of a prominent Iranian figure, originally published in the 16th century. All the illustrations in this edition were hand-crafted by an artist acquaintance, while my wife worked on the design of the cover. We then published a limited collectors‘ edition of the book.

A portrait of a lady holding a bottle by Mirza Muhammad Al-Husaini, Persia, 17th century
When I look at this woman she is relaxed; she is wearing flattering clothing that reveals her sensual silhouette; she’s holding a bottle and a glass, probably drinking wine. I think it’s an interesting miniature in terms of representing a liberal aspect of Islamic history many are unaware of.

Melons by Zakir Huseynov
Born in Baku, Huseynov was a student of Azim Amimadze Art School, where my grandfather taught back in the day. His works are simple and special at the same time, depicting daily life scenes and landscapes. When we met, I felt his incredible energy and internal light straight away. Sadly, he passed away in 2010.

Beggar by Huseyn Hagverdi
Also a Baku native and Azim Amimadze Art School graduate, Hagverdi works in painting, graphic arts and sculpture. When it comes to sculpture, he develops his subjects in depth, highlighting the most significant aspects and ignoring trivialities.

Japanese sword
This has a whole story behind it. The idea of its creation came when my son asked me what a meteorite was. I was later invited to a presentation of Japanese swords at a gallery in Saint Petersburg. And it all came together. I later purchased a meteorite for the sword to be made from. Blacksmiths from three generations from an ancient Japanese dynasty have worked on three identical swords, one of which has been gifted to the Atsuta Shrine in Nagoya.

Recommended For You

Related Articles

Favourite Things Ulvi

Ulvi Kasimov

Ulvi Kasimov

View Less
Favourite Things Ulvi

Japanese sword

Japanese sword

View Less
Favourite Things Ulvi

A portrait of a lady holding a bottle by Mirza Muhammad Al-Husaini, Persia, 17th century

A portrait of a lady holding a bottle by Mirza Muhammad Al-Husaini, Persia, 17th century

View Less
Favourite Things Ulvi

Melons by Zakir Huseynov

Melons by Zakir Huseynov

View Less
Favourite Things Ulvi

Tales of Don Juan of Persia by Uruch Beg

Tales of Don Juan of Persia by Uruch Beg

View Less
Favourite Things Ulvi

Beggar by Huseyn Hagverdi

Beggar by Huseyn Hagverdi

View Less